Berry DHA

Berry DHA

Berry DHA

SKU GEN126
Brand Genestra
Unit Size 225ml (7.6 fl oz)
Dosage Adults and Children (1 year and older): Take two teaspoons once daily with a meal or as recommended by your healthcare practitioner. If preferred, Berry DHA can be mixed with juice or water. Shake well before each use.
Properties Guaranteed to contain no added wheat, yeast, gluten, artificial coloring or flavoring or dairy products. Vacuum-sealed for your protection and for product freshness. Do not use if outer seal is missing or broken. Refrigerate after opening.
 
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Price: $62.50
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Description
Product overview: 
296 mg EPA and 600 mg DHA per serving size
• Helps support cognitive health and/or brain function(1)*
• Helps support the development of the brain, eyes and nerves in children up to 12 years of age(2)*
Sourced from sardine and anchovy
• NEO-3™ natural EPA and DHA enrichment
Emulsified for enhanced absorption and improved taste
• WisDOM-3™ proprietary emulsification process is proven in human clinical trials to double omega-3 fatty acids bioavailability
• WisDOM-3™ also improves overall taste and increases patient compliance
With added vitamins and anthocyanins
• Includes vitamin C
• Anthocyanins from a blend of black currant, elderberry, blueberry, chokeberry and apple
Convenient, great-tasting liquid format
• Fruit-flavoured base of orange, mango, banana and pineapple purees increases patient compliance
 
 
Pharmax and GENESTRA BRANDS™ are Omega-3 science leaders, incorporating cutting edge NEO-3™natural EPA and DHA enrichment process for demonstrated efficacy, stability and superb palatability. We utilize independent testing and are certified for quality, purity and label claims along with a commitment to environmental sustainability.
References: 
1 NHPD Monograh on Fish Oil July 2012
2 NHPD Monograh on Fish Oil July 2012
Additional product info
Fish oils may improve cardiovascular health by altering lipid metabolism, inducing haemodynamic changes, decreasing arrhythmias, modulating platelet function, improving endothelial function and inhibiting inflammatory pathways (1). In fact, fish oil is recognized by the NHPD of Health Canada to help support and maintain cardiovascular health and to help reduce serum triglycerides/triacylglycerols (2). Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA; 22:5n-3) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 22:6n-3) are the 2 principal omega-3 fatty acids in marine oils. Recent data from human studies showed that these 2 fatty acids have differential effects on serum lipids and lipoproteins, serum glucose, blood pressure, heart rate and endothelial function (3). EPA and DHA alter membrane fluidity, interact with transcription factors such as PPAR and sterol regulatory element binding protein, and are substrates for enzymes including cyclooxygenase, lipoxygenase and cytochrome P450 (4). The independent effects of EPA and DHA are however poorly understood. While both EPA (2.2-4.8 grams/day) and DHA (2.3-4.9 grams/day) decrease TAG levels, only DHA appears to increase HDL and LDL particle size. Evidence to date also suggests that DHA is more efficient in decreasing blood pressure, heart rate and platelet aggregation compared to EPA (7). On the other hand, EPA (4 grams/day), but not DHA, appears to increase fasting glucose concentrations in overweight, mildly hyperlipidemic men (8). Reduction of postprandial triacylglycerol (TG) concentration may be cardioprotective. Studies have shown that chronic omega-3 fatty acid supplementation (4 grams of either EPA or DHA per day) significantly lowers postprandial TG concentrations regardless of the type of fat in test meal (9).*
 
EPA and DHA are crucial to brain development and normal brain functioning. The n-6 and n-3 series of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFA) have an important role during gestation, lactation and infancy since they are constituents of cell membrane phospholipids and precursors of eicosanoids. LC-PUFA are biosynthesised from essential fatty acids (EFA) (linoleic acid, LA, 18: 2n-6, and linolenic acid, LNA, 18:3 n-3) by successive desaturation and elongation steps in the intestine, liver and brain. Both, arachidonic acid (AA, 20:4 n-6) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6 n-3), are found in neural structures and particularly DHA is a component of neurone membranes and external segments of photoreceptors in the retina (10). As such, fish oil supplementation rich in DHA such as tuna oil supports the development of the brain, eyes and nerves in children and up to 12 years of ageadolescents and helps support cognitive health and brain function (11).*
 
DHA is particularly important to brain functioning due to its influence on neural membrane properties, which modulate cell signalling. DHA concentration in the brain decreases with age in humans and this has been postulated to be consequential to the age-related deterioration in central nervous system functions (12). Ninety days of DHA supplementation in the form of tuna oil (1,000 mg per day, providing 252 mg DHA and 60 mg EPA) was found to significantly raise both plasma DHA and total ?-3 plasma, as well as significantly lower total ?-6 levels in participants aged 45-77 years. Moreover, for participants with corrected vision, the group receiving DHA were found to have significantly better right eye visual acuity post-treatment in comparison with the placebo group (13).*
 
Principal therapeutic benefits attributable to anthocyanins include antioxidant protection and maintenance of DNA integrity. Results from a double-blind placebo-controlled, crossover study suggest that intake of blackcurrant anthocyanins (17 mg/Kg BW) may increase peripheral blood flow, reducing muscle fatigue (17). Studies have also shown that supplementation with berries rich in anthocyanins were effective in reducing oxidative stress associated with aging, and were beneficial in reversing age-related neuronal and behavioral changes (18).*
References: 
1 Cottin SC, Sanders TA, Hall WL. The differential effects of EPA and DHA on cardiovascular risk factors. Proc Nutr Soc. 2011 May;70(2):215-31. Abstract; Page 225, Conclusion
2 NHPD Monograph on Fish Oil. March 2009.
3 Woodman RJ, Mori TA, Burke V, Puddey IB, Watts GF, Beilin LJ.Effects of purified eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoicacids on glycemic control, blood pressure, and serum lipids in type 2 diabetic patients with treated hypertension.Am J ClinNutr. 2002 Nov;76(5):1007-15. Page 1007, Introduction
4 Cottin SC, Sanders TA, Hall WL. The differential effects of EPA and DHA on cardiovascular risk factors. ProcNutr Soc. 2011 May;70(2):215-31. Abstract; Page 225, Conclusion
7 Cottin SC, Sanders TA, Hall WL. The differential effects of EPA and DHA on cardiovascular risk factors. Proc Nutr Soc. 2011 May;70(2):215-31. Abstract; Page 225, Conclusion
8 Woodman RJ, Mori TA, Burke V, Puddey IB, Watts GF, Beilin LJ.Effects of purified eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoicacids on glycemic control, blood pressure, and serum lipids in type 2 diabetic patients with treated hypertension.Am J ClinNutr. 2002 Nov;76(5):1007-15. Page 1007, Introduction
9 Park, Y. and Harris, W.S. Omega-3 fatty acid supplementation accelerates chylomicron triglyceride clearance.J Lipid Res. 2003 Mar;44(3):455-63. Page 455, Introduction
10 Gil A, Ramirez M, Gil M.Role of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids in infant nutrition.Eur J ClinNutr. 2003 Sep;57 Suppl 1:S31-4. Page S31, Introduction;
11 NHPD Monograph on Fish Oil. March 2009.
12 Danthiir V, Burns NR, Nettelbeck T, Wilson C, Wittert G. The Older People, Omega-3, and Cognitive Health (EPOCH) trial design and methodology: A randomised, double-blind, controlled trial investigating the effect of long-chain omega-3 fatty acids on cognitive ageing and wellbeing in cognitively healthy older adults. Nutr J. 2011 Oct 20;10(1):117. Page 2, Background, 2nd paragraph
13 Stough C, Downey L, Silber B, Lloyd J, Kure C, Wesnes K, Camfield D. The effects of 90-day supplementation with the Omega-3 essential fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) on cognitive function and visual acuity in a healthy aging population. Neurobiol Aging. 2011 Apr 30. Abstract; Page 2, 1st paragraph right side
17 Matsumoto H, Takenami E, Iwasaki-Kurashige K, Osada T, Katsumura T, Hamaoka T. Effects of blackcurrant anthocyanin intake on peripheral muscle circulation during typing work in humans.Eur J Appl Physiol. 2005 May;94(1-2):36-45. Abstract; Page 44, Conclusion
18 Bagchi D, Sen CK, Bagchi M, Atalay M.Anti-angiogenic, antioxidant, and anti-carcinogenic properties of a novel anthocyanin-rich berry extract formula.Biochemistry (Mosc). 2004 Jan;69(1):75-80, 1 p preceding 75.Abstract; Page 75, Introduction
Ingredients

Supplement Facts
Serving Size: 2 Teaspoons (10 ml)
Servings per Container: about 22
              
Calories     45
Calories from Fat    25
Total Fat     2.5 g
Total Carbohydrate    5 g
Sugars      3 g
Vitamin C (ascorbic acid)   50 mg
Fish Oil (Tuna, Sardine and Anchovy)  2556 g

Yielding
DHA (Docosahexaenoic acid)   600 mg
EPA (Eicosapentaenoic acid)   296 mg
Total Omega-3 Fatty Acids   1086 mg
Wild Berry-Apple Concentrate   1000 mg
(blend of Ribes nigrum, Sambucus nigra,
 Vaccinium myrtillus, Aronia melanocarpa
 and Malus pumila fruits)
Yielding
Anthocyanins    30 mg

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