Coriolus and HPV

 

Clinical Trial Results show Proof-of-Concept for use of 

Coriolus versicolor as Immunonutrition in HPV Patients with Cervical Lesions (LSIL) The results of a year long clinical trial examining the effects of mushroom supplementation in patients with Human Papillomavirus (HPV) have recently been presented at congress. Dr. Jose Silva Couto and Dr. Daniel Pereira da Silva of the Cervical Pathology Unit of the Portuguese Institute of Oncology in Coimbra, Portugal presented their findings at the 20

The poster presentation detailed the results of the evaluation of the Efficacy of

Dr. Silva Couto

a)

b)

th European Congress of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, in Lisbon Portugal. This study provides a promising set of results and demonstrates proof-of concept for the question as to whether immunonutrition supplements can be successfully used to improve HPV status in patients.

Coriolus versicolor Supplementation in patients infected with HPV with low-grade squamous intraepthithelial lesions (LSIL). The Coriolus versicolor mushroom supplied for the study was produced by Mycology Research Laboratories Ltd in tablet form (500 mg/tablet). et al. found that Coriolus versicolor supplementation over a period of one year substantially increased regression of the dysplasia (LSIL) and induced clearance of the high risk sub-types of the HPV virus responsible for cervical cancer. Coriolus versicolor supplementation demonstrated a 72% regression rate in LSIL lesions compared to 47.5% without supplementation. Coriolus versicolor supplementation demonstrated a 90% regression rate in the high risk HPV virus sub-types compared to 8.5% without supplementation. Study Design

The year long study was funded by

Mycology Research Laboratories Ltd. Forty-three (43) patients with HPV Lesions (LSIL) were divided into two groups:

A Control group (21 patients) who did not receive any treatment

InterComm 2

A treatment group (22 patients) who each received

Coriolus versicolor supplementation for a period of one year (6 tablets/day i.e. 3g/day) Protocol Design

At first observation, patients were examined with colposcopy, biopsy and HPV tipification (hybrid capture). Cervical cytology exams (Pap smear tests) determined the patients’ LSIL status and this was confirmed through colposcopy and biopsy.

Four months after the first observations, colposcopy and cervical cytology was again carried out on all patients. At the same time, there was an evaluation of the possible side effects from Coriolus supplementation.

After one year, (at the end of the supplementation period), colposcopy, cervical cytology and HPV typing were carried out on all patients.

Success Parameters

The authors measured the efficacy of Coriolus supplementation in LSIL patients in terms of the evolution of HPV status from High Risk HPV+ status to High Risk HPV- status. High Risk HPV, refers to certain strains of HPV that are known to be associated with causing cervical cancer, such strains include HPV 16, 18, 31 and 45. The persistence of cervical lesions as measured by colposcopy and cytology was also determined.

Study Population

Out of the 43 patients enrolled, 39 completed the trial. Of the four (4) who did not complete the trial, 1 patient left the country and 3 discontinued supplementation due to mild side-effects. The side-effects were not serious and did not warrant further medical intervention.

The age distribution of the two groups was very similar. Patients receiving

Coriolus versicolor supplementation had an average age of 31.7 years (minimum age of 19, maximum age of 49 years). The control group had an average age of 33.4 years (minimum age of 19 and a maximum of 51 years). Results

Of the 39 patients who completed one year of follow-up, 18 took Coriolus supplementation, while the other 21 patients received no therapy (Control group). After 1 year 13 of the 18 patients in the Coriolus group showed normal cervical cytology (72.5%) while only 10 of the patients in the control group did (47.5%).

InterComm 3

Of the 39 patients, 22 were positive for high risk HPV subtypes.10 of these patients were in the Coriolus group and 12 in the control group. After 1 year 9 of the 10 in the Coriolus group had reverted to HPV- status (90%) while only 1 of the 12 in the control group had (8.5%).

What do these results mean for HPV patients?

The results from this study are encouraging and provide insight into the effectiveness of

While the study sample size is limited in number, the results strongly suggest that using

It is also likely that

According to Dr Silva Couto, one of the study authors ”

Coriolus versicolor as a useful immunonutrition agent. Using Coriolus supplementation for one year resulted in 72.5% of recipients reverting to normal cytology compares with only 47.5% of the control group. Encouragingly, 90% of the Coriolus recipients reverted to a HPV- status compared with only 8.5% in the control group. Coriolus versicolor as a food supplementation agent offers doctors a useful nutritional tool when treating HPV (LSIL) patients over the age of 35 or those HPV (LSIL) patients with compromised immune systems. Coriolus versicolor could be beneficial in HSIL patients who have undergone surgery but who experience recurrent lesions caused by persistent HPV viral infection; the eradication or “control” of the viral infection is key to both LSIL and HSIL patient care. At present, we believe that the optimal supplementation period may actually be as short as six months. Further testing is required to determine the best way to reduce the time period from the one year period used in this study.”. A shorter period of treatment would aid compliance as well as reducing the already minimal overall cost of therapy. Why Coriolus versicolor?

As already stated, the mushroom

1. Jean A. Monro, Chronic Fatigue Immune Dysfunction Syndrome. J Integrative Medicine 2004;8:101-108

2. Jean A. Monro Treatment of Cancer with Mushroom Products. Arch Env Health 2003;58:533-537

Coriolus versicolor has been used in traditional Asian medicine for a long time. It is now known that Coriolus contains high quantities of Beta-glucans that act to stimulate the immune system. Studies have shown that Coriolus can double the number of natural killer cells after only 8-weeks of treatment.1,2 The benefits of treatment with the fungus has also been tested in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome. Coriolus versicolor (strain CV-OH1) is grown aseptically on sterile, edible grain, harvested and then produced as a tablet following good manufacturing practice according to pharmaceutical guidelines. It is free from pesticide, heavy metals and contaminants. InterComm 4

Will Mycology Research Laboratories be furthering this work?

The Mycology Research Lab´s Managing Director, William Ahern stated: “

We realise that the study sample size is small and that taking six tablets per day may be challenging for some individuals, from a compliance viewpoint. However, both Dr Silva Couto et al. have significantly contributed to the development of a nutritional approach to HPV care that is complementary with existing HPV treatment protocols.” Further research is ongoing to determine the optimal treatment period for HPV patients. This study has proven that

Coriolus versicolor supplementation has a place in the management of HPV infection. The estimated cost per day for Coriolus versicolor supplementation under this protocol would be € 52.00 per month (€ 1,75 per day) or £ 41,60 per month (£1,40 per day), making Coriolus treatment a viable treatment without undue increases in the cost of therapy. For more information on the clinical study please contact

Dr. José Silva Couto at jsilvacouto@sapo.pt.

For more information on

Dr. Jean Monro at jmonro@breakspearmedical.com

Tel: 0044 1442 261 333 Ext 314

For more information on Mycology Research Laboratories please contact William Ahern at info@mycologyresearch.com

 

What is the link between HPV and Cervical Cancer?

In women between the ages of 35 and 55 the rates of cervical cancer are high. The risk for cervical cancer seems to increase the earlier a woman first has sexual intercourse and as the number of sexual partners increases. Failure to have a regular Pap test also increases risk.

There are some 100 strains of HPV in all, with different genotypes. One small group of HPV have been identified as being responsible for certain types of tumours in different epithelia. This group of HPV is the number one cause of cervical cancer (carcinoma). Other HPV strains cause genital warts and have led to HPV sometimes being called the wart virus or genital wart virus. However, the types of HPV that cause warts are not the types that cause cervical cancer.

There are 13 sub-types of HPV that are considered “high risk” for cervical cancer, including HPV 16, 18, 31 and 45. Of these HPV 16 and 18 are thought to be responsible for 70% of the cases of cervical cancer. High risk types can cause changes in the cells covering the cervix that make them more likely to become cancerous in time. If a patient has persistent or frequent infections with any of the “High risk” types they are at risk of developing pre-cancerous cervical cells or cervical cancer.

HPV infection can result in a change in cervical epithelial (skin wall) cells from normal to one of two squamous cell types: high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL) or low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL).

Classification of cervical dysplasia:

Cytology Histology

LSIL CIN 1 Minimal or mild cervical dysplasia

HSIL CIN 2 Moderate cervical dysplasia

HSIL CIN 3/CIS Severe cervical dysplasia/ Carcinoma in situ

Carcinoma Invasive Carcinoma

_________________________

*

Coriolus versicolor supplied by Mycology Research Laboratories Ltd. InterComm 6 CIN-1 Treatment (LSIL)

The usual treatment for CIN-1 patients is laser vaporization or

However, in women (and their sexual partners) over the age of 35, especially those who take oral contraceptives and smoke, the immune system is often too compromised to clear the virus. Consequently, when diagnosed with CIN-1 (LSIL-HPV) infection, such patients may need adjunct supplementation to support their immune system against progressive HPV infection.

one of “wait and see”. The prognosis of this situation is not as dangerous as with HSIL. In some cases, especially among women below the age of 35, the immune system is capable of “clearing” or keeping the virus under control. CIN-2/ CIN-3 Treatment (HSIL)

Usual treatment for HSIL patients involves removing lesions with a scalpel, laser therapy, or loop electrosurgical excision procedure. These surgical treatments preserve a women’s ability to have children. As HSIL lesions can recur after surgery, medical practitioners advise women to return for examinations and Pap smear tests every 6 months for the first 2 year after surgery and every 12 months subsequently.

If the cancer is more advanced, then hysterectomy plus removal of adjacent structures and lymph nodes (radical hysterectomy) is usually necessary. Radiation therapy is also highly effective for treating advanced cervical cancer that has not spread beyond the pelvic region.

Reference: Clinical Journal of Mycology Feb 2007, Vol. 2 . Edition 1. p 6.

About Mycology Research Laboratories (MRL)

Mycology Research Laboratories Ltd (www.mycologyresearch.com) was founded in 1997 by four individuals with backgrounds in mycology, mushroom cultivation and pharmacy. The founders were William Ahern, Malcolm Clark, David Law and Tom Chapman.

Since 1997, Mycology Research Laboratories has focused on the clinical development of mushroom nutrition as food supplementation. While little understood outside of Japan, Korea and China, the use of mushroom nutrition to support the immune system in various conditions in Asia is used as part of traditional Asian medicine.

InterComm 7

Who do MRL work with?

Over the past ten years, while based in the United Kingdom, Mycology Research Laboratories (www.mycologyresearch.com ) has collaborated with a series of Portuguese institutions in the development of mushroom nutrition. Collaborators include, Professor Amin Karmali, a leading enzyme specialists from the Biotechnology Unit of ISEL in Lisbon; leaders in veterinarian medicine such as Professor Girao Bastos formerly associated with Laboratorio Nacional de Investigação in Lisbon and Professor Tito Fernandes former Dean of the Lisbon School of Veterinarian Medicine. This collaboration is augmented by collaboration with Dr. Silva Couto

In the United Kingdom, Mycology Research has a clinical collaboration with Dr. Jean Monro from the Breakspear Hospital and Dr. Julian Kenyon at the Dove Clinic, while collaboration with UK based clinicians in Traditional Chinese Medicine has included working with John Tindall (Ac. L) based in the Yuan Clinic in North Clapham in London and with Professor Giovanni Maciocia, a leading author in Traditional Chinese Medicine presently lecturing and residing in the United States.

et al. at the Portuguese Institute of Oncology in Coimbra and with the Portuguese pharmaceutical firm Aneid-Produtos Farmacêuticos Lda.. When did MRL first consider using Coriolus supplementation in HPV patients?

In 2001, Dr. Monro first suggested that

Within two months in May of 2001, at the 2

Within three (3) years, in August of 2003, Dr. Silva Couto

Coriolus versicolor supplementation could support the immune system in HPV infected women. In March of 2001, at a mushroom symposium, where the clinical use of Coriolus supplementation in HIV+ patients was presented, Dr. Monro noted that one of the HIV+ patients also had a PAP smear test of 3 which reverted to a normal state after one year of Coriolus supplementation. She further noted that the patient had a decreased HIV viral load and increased CD4 level at the end of the one year supplementation period. nd International Congress on HPV and Cancer held in May of 2001 in Lisbon Portugal, Dr. Monro presented a prospective clinical study to use Coriolus versicolor (3 g/ day) along with folic acid supplementation in HPV patients. et al. initiated their Coriolus versicolor study in both LSIL and HSIL patients. Careful not to confuse the results, both felt it was important to test Coriolus as a single supplement rather than combining two supplements as suggested by Dr. Monro. As noted by co-founder David Law: “Jean’s observation was key to our decision to move ahead.” The HPV study was funded by Mycology Research Laboratories Ltd and took over five (5) years to complete. InterComm 8 What do these trial results mean and where do we go from here?

As noted by Malcolm Clark, “These clinical results will contribute to the body of knowledge that immunonutrition in the form of mushroom nutrition that can play a complementary role in the management of viral conditions. Furthermore, it will contribute to the recognition that both the United Kingdom and Portugal has developed an expertise in the nutritional development and use of mushroom nutrition.”

A joint study in the use of

Coriolus versicolor to support the immune system in post-breast cancer patients by Bastry University, Cancer Treatment Research Foundation (CTRF) and Mycology Research Laboratories is presently in the enrollment stage in the United States. For more information on the clinical study please contact

Dr. Jose Silva Couto at jsilvacouto@sapo.pt.

For more information on

Dr. Jean Monro at jmonro@breakspearmedical.com

For more information on Mycology Research Laboratories please contact William Ahern at info@mycologyresearch.com

Coriolus versicolor as Immunonutrition in HPV Patients with Cervical Lesions (LSIL) The results of a year long clinical trial examining the effects of mushroom supplementation in patients with Human Papillomavirus (HPV) have recently been presented at congress. Dr. Jose Silva Couto and Dr. Daniel Pereira da Silva of the Cervical Pathology Unit of the Portuguese Institute of Oncology in Coimbra, Portugal presented their findings at the 20

The poster presentation detailed the results of the evaluation of the Efficacy of

Dr. Silva Couto

a)

b)

th European Congress of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, in Lisbon Portugal. This study provides a promising set of results and demonstrates proof-of concept for the question as to whether immunonutrition supplements can be successfully used to improve HPV status in patients.

Coriolus versicolor Supplementation in patients infected with HPV with low-grade squamous intraepthithelial lesions (LSIL). The Coriolus versicolor mushroom supplied for the study was produced by Mycology Research Laboratories Ltd in tablet form (500 mg/tablet). et al. found that Coriolus versicolor supplementation over a period of one year substantially increased regression of the dysplasia (LSIL) and induced clearance of the high risk sub-types of the HPV virus responsible for cervical cancer. Coriolus versicolor supplementation demonstrated a 72% regression rate in LSIL lesions compared to 47.5% without supplementation. Coriolus versicolor supplementation demonstrated a 90% regression rate in the high risk HPV virus sub-types compared to 8.5% without supplementation. Study Design

The year long study was funded by

Mycology Research Laboratories Ltd. Forty-three (43) patients with HPV Lesions (LSIL) were divided into two groups:

A Control group (21 patients) who did not receive any treatment

InterComm 2

A treatment group (22 patients) who each received

Coriolus versicolor supplementation for a period of one year (6 tablets/day i.e. 3g/day) Protocol Design

At first observation, patients were examined with colposcopy, biopsy and HPV tipification (hybrid capture). Cervical cytology exams (Pap smear tests) determined the patients’ LSIL status and this was confirmed through colposcopy and biopsy.

Four months after the first observations, colposcopy and cervical cytology was again carried out on all patients. At the same time, there was an evaluation of the possible side effects from Coriolus supplementation.

After one year, (at the end of the supplementation period), colposcopy, cervical cytology and HPV typing were carried out on all patients.

Success Parameters

The authors measured the efficacy of Coriolus supplementation in LSIL patients in terms of the evolution of HPV status from High Risk HPV+ status to High Risk HPV- status. High Risk HPV, refers to certain strains of HPV that are known to be associated with causing cervical cancer, such strains include HPV 16, 18, 31 and 45. The persistence of cervical lesions as measured by colposcopy and cytology was also determined.

Study Population

Out of the 43 patients enrolled, 39 completed the trial. Of the four (4) who did not complete the trial, 1 patient left the country and 3 discontinued supplementation due to mild side-effects. The side-effects were not serious and did not warrant further medical intervention.

The age distribution of the two groups was very similar. Patients receiving

Coriolus versicolor supplementation had an average age of 31.7 years (minimum age of 19, maximum age of 49 years). The control group had an average age of 33.4 years (minimum age of 19 and a maximum of 51 years). Results

Of the 39 patients who completed one year of follow-up, 18 took Coriolus supplementation, while the other 21 patients received no therapy (Control group). After 1 year 13 of the 18 patients in the Coriolus group showed normal cervical cytology (72.5%) while only 10 of the patients in the control group did (47.5%).

InterComm 3

Of the 39 patients, 22 were positive for high risk HPV subtypes.10 of these patients were in the Coriolus group and 12 in the control group. After 1 year 9 of the 10 in the Coriolus group had reverted to HPV- status (90%) while only 1 of the 12 in the control group had (8.5%).

What do these results mean for HPV patients?

The results from this study are encouraging and provide insight into the effectiveness of

While the study sample size is limited in number, the results strongly suggest that using

It is also likely that

According to Dr Silva Couto, one of the study authors ”

Coriolus versicolor as a useful immunonutrition agent. Using Coriolus supplementation for one year resulted in 72.5% of recipients reverting to normal cytology compares with only 47.5% of the control group. Encouragingly, 90% of the Coriolus recipients reverted to a HPV- status compared with only 8.5% in the control group. Coriolus versicolor as a food supplementation agent offers doctors a useful nutritional tool when treating HPV (LSIL) patients over the age of 35 or those HPV (LSIL) patients with compromised immune systems. Coriolus versicolor could be beneficial in HSIL patients who have undergone surgery but who experience recurrent lesions caused by persistent HPV viral infection; the eradication or “control” of the viral infection is key to both LSIL and HSIL patient care. At present, we believe that the optimal supplementation period may actually be as short as six months. Further testing is required to determine the best way to reduce the time period from the one year period used in this study.”. A shorter period of treatment would aid compliance as well as reducing the already minimal overall cost of therapy. Why Coriolus versicolor?

As already stated, the mushroom

1. Jean A. Monro, Chronic Fatigue Immune Dysfunction Syndrome. J Integrative Medicine 2004;8:101-108

2. Jean A. Monro Treatment of Cancer with Mushroom Products. Arch Env Health 2003;58:533-537

Coriolus versicolor has been used in traditional Asian medicine for a long time. It is now known that Coriolus contains high quantities of Beta-glucans that act to stimulate the immune system. Studies have shown that Coriolus can double the number of natural killer cells after only 8-weeks of treatment.1,2 The benefits of treatment with the fungus has also been tested in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome. Coriolus versicolor (strain CV-OH1) is grown aseptically on sterile, edible grain, harvested and then produced as a tablet following good manufacturing practice according to pharmaceutical guidelines. It is free from pesticide, heavy metals and contaminants. InterComm 4

Will Mycology Research Laboratories be furthering this work?

The Mycology Research Lab´s Managing Director, William Ahern stated: “

We realise that the study sample size is small and that taking six tablets per day may be challenging for some individuals, from a compliance viewpoint. However, both Dr Silva Couto et al. have significantly contributed to the development of a nutritional approach to HPV care that is complementary with existing HPV treatment protocols.” Further research is ongoing to determine the optimal treatment period for HPV patients. This study has proven that

Coriolus versicolor supplementation has a place in the management of HPV infection. The estimated cost per day for Coriolus versicolor supplementation under this protocol would be € 52.00 per month (€ 1,75 per day) or £ 41,60 per month (£1,40 per day), making Coriolus treatment a viable treatment without undue increases in the cost of therapy. For more information on the clinical study please contact

Dr. José Silva Couto at jsilvacouto@sapo.pt.

For more information on

Dr. Jean Monro at jmonro@breakspearmedical.com

Tel: 0044 1442 261 333 Ext 314

For more information on Mycology Research Laboratories please contact William Ahern at info@mycologyresearch.com

 

What is the link between HPV and Cervical Cancer?

In women between the ages of 35 and 55 the rates of cervical cancer are high. The risk for cervical cancer seems to increase the earlier a woman first has sexual intercourse and as the number of sexual partners increases. Failure to have a regular Pap test also increases risk.

There are some 100 strains of HPV in all, with different genotypes. One small group of HPV have been identified as being responsible for certain types of tumours in different epithelia. This group of HPV is the number one cause of cervical cancer (carcinoma). Other HPV strains cause genital warts and have led to HPV sometimes being called the wart virus or genital wart virus. However, the types of HPV that cause warts are not the types that cause cervical cancer.

There are 13 sub-types of HPV that are considered “high risk” for cervical cancer, including HPV 16, 18, 31 and 45. Of these HPV 16 and 18 are thought to be responsible for 70% of the cases of cervical cancer. High risk types can cause changes in the cells covering the cervix that make them more likely to become cancerous in time. If a patient has persistent or frequent infections with any of the “High risk” types they are at risk of developing pre-cancerous cervical cells or cervical cancer.

HPV infection can result in a change in cervical epithelial (skin wall) cells from normal to one of two squamous cell types: high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL) or low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL).

Classification of cervical dysplasia:

Cytology Histology

LSIL CIN 1 Minimal or mild cervical dysplasia

HSIL CIN 2 Moderate cervical dysplasia

HSIL CIN 3/CIS Severe cervical dysplasia/ Carcinoma in situ

Carcinoma Invasive Carcinoma

_________________________

*

Coriolus versicolor supplied by Mycology Research Laboratories Ltd. InterComm 6 CIN-1 Treatment (LSIL)

The usual treatment for CIN-1 patients is laser vaporization or

However, in women (and their sexual partners) over the age of 35, especially those who take oral contraceptives and smoke, the immune system is often too compromised to clear the virus. Consequently, when diagnosed with CIN-1 (LSIL-HPV) infection, such patients may need adjunct supplementation to support their immune system against progressive HPV infection.

one of “wait and see”. The prognosis of this situation is not as dangerous as with HSIL. In some cases, especially among women below the age of 35, the immune system is capable of “clearing” or keeping the virus under control. CIN-2/ CIN-3 Treatment (HSIL)

Usual treatment for HSIL patients involves removing lesions with a scalpel, laser therapy, or loop electrosurgical excision procedure. These surgical treatments preserve a women’s ability to have children. As HSIL lesions can recur after surgery, medical practitioners advise women to return for examinations and Pap smear tests every 6 months for the first 2 year after surgery and every 12 months subsequently.

If the cancer is more advanced, then hysterectomy plus removal of adjacent structures and lymph nodes (radical hysterectomy) is usually necessary. Radiation therapy is also highly effective for treating advanced cervical cancer that has not spread beyond the pelvic region.

Reference: Clinical Journal of Mycology Feb 2007, Vol. 2 . Edition 1. p 6.

About Mycology Research Laboratories (MRL)

Mycology Research Laboratories Ltd (www.mycologyresearch.com) was founded in 1997 by four individuals with backgrounds in mycology, mushroom cultivation and pharmacy. The founders were William Ahern, Malcolm Clark, David Law and Tom Chapman.

Since 1997, Mycology Research Laboratories has focused on the clinical development of mushroom nutrition as food supplementation. While little understood outside of Japan, Korea and China, the use of mushroom nutrition to support the immune system in various conditions in Asia is used as part of traditional Asian medicine.

InterComm 7

Who do MRL work with?

Over the past ten years, while based in the United Kingdom, Mycology Research Laboratories (www.mycologyresearch.com ) has collaborated with a series of Portuguese institutions in the development of mushroom nutrition. Collaborators include, Professor Amin Karmali, a leading enzyme specialists from the Biotechnology Unit of ISEL in Lisbon; leaders in veterinarian medicine such as Professor Girao Bastos formerly associated with Laboratorio Nacional de Investigação in Lisbon and Professor Tito Fernandes former Dean of the Lisbon School of Veterinarian Medicine. This collaboration is augmented by collaboration with Dr. Silva Couto

In the United Kingdom, Mycology Research has a clinical collaboration with Dr. Jean Monro from the Breakspear Hospital and Dr. Julian Kenyon at the Dove Clinic, while collaboration with UK based clinicians in Traditional Chinese Medicine has included working with John Tindall (Ac. L) based in the Yuan Clinic in North Clapham in London and with Professor Giovanni Maciocia, a leading author in Traditional Chinese Medicine presently lecturing and residing in the United States.

et al. at the Portuguese Institute of Oncology in Coimbra and with the Portuguese pharmaceutical firm Aneid-Produtos Farmacêuticos Lda.. When did MRL first consider using Coriolus supplementation in HPV patients?

In 2001, Dr. Monro first suggested that

Within two months in May of 2001, at the 2

Within three (3) years, in August of 2003, Dr. Silva Couto

Coriolus versicolor supplementation could support the immune system in HPV infected women. In March of 2001, at a mushroom symposium, where the clinical use of Coriolus supplementation in HIV+ patients was presented, Dr. Monro noted that one of the HIV+ patients also had a PAP smear test of 3 which reverted to a normal state after one year of Coriolus supplementation. She further noted that the patient had a decreased HIV viral load and increased CD4 level at the end of the one year supplementation period. nd International Congress on HPV and Cancer held in May of 2001 in Lisbon Portugal, Dr. Monro presented a prospective clinical study to use Coriolus versicolor (3 g/ day) along with folic acid supplementation in HPV patients. et al. initiated their Coriolus versicolor study in both LSIL and HSIL patients. Careful not to confuse the results, both felt it was important to test Coriolus as a single supplement rather than combining two supplements as suggested by Dr. Monro. As noted by co-founder David Law: “Jean’s observation was key to our decision to move ahead.” The HPV study was funded by Mycology Research Laboratories Ltd and took over five (5) years to complete. InterComm 8 What do these trial results mean and where do we go from here?

As noted by Malcolm Clark, “These clinical results will contribute to the body of knowledge that immunonutrition in the form of mushroom nutrition that can play a complementary role in the management of viral conditions. Furthermore, it will contribute to the recognition that both the United Kingdom and Portugal has developed an expertise in the nutritional development and use of mushroom nutrition.”

A joint study in the use of

Coriolus versicolor to support the immune system in post-breast cancer patients by Bastry University, Cancer Treatment Research Foundation (CTRF) and Mycology Research Laboratories is presently in the enrollment stage in the United States. For more information on the clinical study please contact

Dr. Jose Silva Couto at jsilvacouto@sapo.pt.

For more information on

Dr. Jean Monro at jmonro@breakspearmedical.com

For more information on Mycology Research Laboratories please contact William Ahern at info@mycologyresearch.com